2011 Grant Winners

 

Professionalism Tipping Points: Teaching Innovations in Clinical Medical Education

Project Leader:
Dr. Anne Gill, Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Medical Ethics and Director of Longitudinal Programs, Baylor College of Medicine

Project Description:
The Baylor College of Medicine, “Professionalism Tipping Points: Teaching Innovations in Clincial Medical Education” proposal is a longitudinal, developmentally appropriate educational intervention for students in years 1-4 of medical school. Strategically sequenced interventions include clinical debriefing, reflective writing, mentoring, and standardized patient encounters to both teach and assess professional behaviors related to social justice, distribution of finite resources, physician advocacy and patient interests.


 

 

Community Faculty Development on Medical Ethics and Professionalism


Project Leader:

Dr. Elza Mylona, Associate Dean of Curriculum Affairs and Faculty Development, Stony Brook University Medical Center School of Medicine

Project Description:
The purpose of this project is to use the Objective Structured Teaching Exercise (OSTE) format to train and evaluate faculty on how teach professionalism and medical ethics to students in clinical settings. We will develop significant and meaningful teaching scenarios based on an extensive literature review on the most commonly encountered professional and ethical dilemmas in medical student clinical training. Performance checklist assessment tools will be created for each scenario that includes general and scenario-specific skill and action items. Assessment and evaluation of the project outcomes include an OSTE post survey, confidence in teaching survey (pre-post OSTE), and self-assessment/reflection to be completed by participating faculty. We will also compare medical student end of year OSCE performance, a written self-reflection, and student survey results between those who were instructed by OSTE faculty participants and those who were not. 


 

Development of a Physician Community Leadership Curriculum

Project Leader:
Dr. Ronald Fong, Director of the Family Medicine Residency Network, University of California, Davis, School of Medicine

Project Description:
We have designed a community leadership track to provide balance between family and community medicine. With the ongoing implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the increased emphasis on the Patient-Centered Medical Home, we developed a responsive and interactive curriculum to train future family medicine physicians. Residents will have the opportunity to work with leaders and teams engaged in public policy, community health, and primary care work force issues.


 

Clinical Inter-Professional Professionalism Curriculum

Project Leader:
Melissa Fischer, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Medical Education, University of Massachusetts Medical School


Project Description:
The Clinical Inter-professional Professionalism Curriculum (CIPC) builds on existing curricula in professionalism and inter-professional education (IPE) at the University of Massachusetts School of Medicine and the Graduate School of Nursing. Medical students, nursing students, residents and faculty will work together to apply the principles of professionalism to structured cases and video vignettes, to examples of professional or unprofessional behavior reported from their clinical experiences and to in-situ simulation scenarios. The curriculum will be evaluated for continuous improvement and dissemination of results and learning objects will occur intramurally through Schwartz Center Rounds and coordination with our chief clinical partner’s Office of Quality Improvement and extramurally through national presentations. We expect that the CIPC will have an impact on both individual behavior and the institutional culture of professionalism.


 

Tools and Strategies for Modeling and Reinforcing Professionalism

Project Leader:
Dr. Alicia Monroe, Professor of Family Medicine and Vice Dean of Educational affairs, University of South Florida College of Medicine (in partnership with Lehigh Valley Health Network)


Project Description:
As a joint proposal by the USF Office of Educational Affairs, the USF Department of Pediatrics and the Department of Medicine at Lehigh Valley Health Network, USF’s program seeks to develop six new learner-centered curriculum modules focused on professional development that will assist medical students and residents in building capacity to “put patients’ interest first.” Teaching techniques will include small group discussions, role playing for students and simulation scenarios. Reflection and mindful practices will be utilized to identify attitudes, arguments, motivation, and strategies that can contribute to either exemplary or lapses in professional behavior.


 

 

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