Awardees

Shetal I. Shah

Shetal I. Shah, MD, FAAP

Specialty:
Pediatrics and Neonatology
Grant Year:
2012
Dr. Shah is a Clinical Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Neonatology in the Division of Neonatology, at the State University of New York, Stony Brook and Stony Brook Children’s Hospital. Dr. Shah graduated Magna Cum Laude from Princeton University, with a degree in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. He received his MD degree with Honors from Cornell University Medical College in New York City and then completed a residency in pediatrics at Duke University Children’s Hospital in Durham, North Carolina, followed by fellowship in neonatology at New York University School of Medicine, also in New York City. He serves as Legislative Chairman for the Long Island Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and serves on the New York State American Academy of Pediatrics Policy and Advocacy Committee. Dr. Shah’s work is centered on improving immunization access and delivery for the prevention of disease to newborns, and he has published over 50 peer-reviewed articles related to neonatal care. Bridging his scientific and public policy roles, Dr. Shah’s research and subsequent advocacy through the AAP resulted in the passage of two New York State Laws, the Neonatal Influenza Protection Act, in 2009 and the Neonatal Pertussis Prevention Act in 2012. Both laws will help protect over 50,000 newborns a year from life-threatening vaccine-preventable diseases. He has worked with state legislators to widen smoking bans across the state, ensure fair payment for vaccination by primary care givers and improve physician negotiation opportunities across the state. He authored the official New York State AAP opposition toward proposals that would reduce the number of children immunized in New York State. At the federal level, Dr. Shah often advises the Long Island Congressional Delegation on matters related to child health. He has worked with then-Senator Hillary Clinton to expand the State Child Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) to pregnant mothers, and sought increased funding for pediatric research and graduate medical education. A Fulbright Scholar, he received a citation from the 111th United States Congress for his role in advising federal legislators on the impact of health-care reform on children’s health. He is also the recipient of two proclamations from the 112th Congress for his work with the American Academy of Pediatrics. He has also received an American Medical Association Physician Leadership Award, and multiple AAP research and advocacy awards. His book, Passport to Illness: Voyages in and Out of Medicine recounts his international experiences working in clinics around the world.
Dipesh Navsaria

Dipesh Navsaria, MPH, MSLIS, MD

Specialty:
Pediatrics
Grant Year:
2012
Dipesh Navsaria, MPH, MSLIS, MD, is a pediatrician with graduate training in children’s librarianship. An assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, his clinical work is primary care pediatrics at a community health center. Academically, he directs advocacy training for the pediatric residency program and is very recently involved significantly in the Department of Population Health around public health training for medical students. One of his most proud accomplishments was overseeing the founding of Reach Out and Read Wisconsin, the statewide affiliate for the nationally-renowned early literacy promotion program. Combined with his work on the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Early Brain and Child Development Leadership Group, this has pushed the notion of early literacy promotion into the statewide consciousness as an evidence-guided, scalable model for foundational educational skill development in children at risk. Dr Navsaria has extensive public engagement and involvement in a variety of child health arenas, including early childhood education, family literacy programs, and professional medical societies. Juggling these priorities can be tricky, and he is fond of quoting the author EB White: "But I arise in the morning torn between a desire to improve the world and a desire to enjoy the world. This makes it hard to plan the day." Born in London, raised in New York City, and trained in Boston, Washington DC, and Illinois, he finds the Midwest "agrees with him" and loves Wisconsin dearly. He also appreciates the support of his long-suffering wife, two amazing children, and a handful of animals, including his backyard chickens. As he states: "I plan to remain at the fascinating intersection of translational science, policy, clinical medicine, public health, and education. Contemporary medicine should move beyond espousing a deep but single-minded interest in one, narrow area and instead encourage the discernment of connections between different fields. I value greatly the skillful diffusion of knowledge and understanding. Too often scientific and other intellectual breakthroughs are shrouded in obscurity. Basic science research may be interesting for its’ own sake, but it isn’t until it is applied to clinical situations, broadened to the population level, reflected in policy, taught to the next generation of clinicians, and shared clearly with the world that, at long last, it blossoms forth fully."
Dr. Kimberly S. G. Chang

Dr. Kimberly S. G. Chang,MD

Specialty:
Primary Care
Grant Year:
2011
Dr. Kimberly S.G. Chang is a family physician and Site Director of the Frank Kiang Medical Center of Asian Health Services (AHS), a comprehensive community health center in Oakland, California’s Chinatown, which provides primary health care services to over 21,000 limited-English-proficient, low-income, and underserved Asian immigrants and refugees annually. Dr. Chang graduated from Columbia University with a B.A. in East Asian Languages and Cultures, and received her medical degree from the University of Hawai’i John A. Burns School of Medicine.  She completed her family medicine residency at the University of California at San Francisco – San Francisco General Hospital, working with and learning from urban underserved patients and populations. As a clinician for AHS’ teen clinic, which provides targeted health care to high-risk adolescents and young adults, Dr. Chang works with many commercially sexually exploited children (CSEC)/victims of domestic minor sex trafficking (DMST) in the treatment and prevention of illness and disease. She advocates for community-based services to support victims before they are arrested and engaged in the juvenile justice system, and before they become further entrenched in the cycle of violence and exploitation.  She has also trained many clinicians, outreach workers, and educators in the identification of medical and mental health needs for CSEC/DMST. Dr. Chang’s advocacy for CSEC/DMST spans multiple disciplines, from the local level to the national level. She serves as a faculty member of the National District Attorneys Association’s (NDAA) National Center for the Prosecution of Child Abuse. In addition to practicing full scope ambulatory and inpatient family medicine, Dr. Chang teaches and mentors pre-medical and medical students and residents at AHS.  She serves on multiple advisory councils, including the Association of Asian Pacific American Community Health Organizations’ National Research Advisory Council, the National Association of Community Health Centers’ Subcommittee on Healthcare Finance and Clinical Practice Committees, and the University of California at San Francisco’s Program in Medical Education for the Urban Underserved Advisory Council and Community Advisory Board. She serves as a faculty member of the National District Attorneys Association’s (NDAA) National Center for the Prosecution of Child Abuse
Dr. Michael P. Hirsh

Dr. Michael P. Hirsh,MD

Specialty:
Pediatrics
Grant Year:
2011
Dr. Michael Hirsh was born in New York City. After attending Bronx High School of Science, he matriculated at Columbia College of Columbia University where he obtained a BA in 1975. He graduated summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa. He then went to Harvard Medical School where he graduated in 1979. He then began surgical residency training at Columbia Presbyterian University Medical Center from 1979 to 1984 and completed a pediatric surgical fellowship at St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children of Temple University in Philadelphia in 1986. Thereafter, he spent six years at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center and from 1988 to 1992 was co-director of the Trauma Center there. He also was co-director of the Pediatric Critical Care Unit. In 1992, Dr. Hirsh left Worcester, Massachusetts, to take a position first at Allegheny General in Pittsburgh, PA. He worked there from 1992 to 1997. Dr. Hirsh transferred his work to Mercy Hospital of Pittsburgh where he worked until he returned to University of Massachusetts Memorial Medical Center in 2000. He is a Professor of Pediatrics and Surgery at the University of Massachusetts Medical School and Director of the Divisions of Pediatric Surgery and Trauma of the University of Massachusetts Memorial Children’s Medical Center. He also became Associate Director of Pediatric Critical Care. Dr. Hirsh has been Co-Director of the Trauma Program as well and served as overall Trauma Director for patients of all ages from 2004-2007. During this time, UMMHC received its accreditation as a Level 1 Adult and Pediatric Trauma Center (2005). Dr. Hirsh currently serves on the Board of the Injury Free Coalition, a consortium of 43 Injury Prevention sites based at Level 1 Pediatric Trauma Centers, as its Past President (2008-2010). He is the co-founder of the Goods for Guns Coalition of Worcester that has been organizing a yearly Gun Buy-Back since 2002, co-sponsored by the Worcester Police Department, the Department of Public Health, The Worcester District Medical Society and UMass Memorial Health Care’s Injury Prevention Program. He also is serving as the President of the Worcester District Medical Society. In 2010, he was appointed Surgeon-In-Chief for the UMassMemorial Children’s Medical Center. On April 15, 2012, Dr. Hirsh was appointed by City Manager, Michael O’Brien, as the Acting Commissioner of Public Health for the City of Worcester. He has been happily married for 33 years to wife, Julianne and has 2 children, Scott, 29 and Esty, 24.
Dr. Anne Davis

Dr. Anne Davis,MD, MPH

Specialty:
Gynecology
Grant Year:
2011
Anne Davis, MD, MPH is an Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology at Columbia University Medical Center.  She is a graduate of the Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons and completed a residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Washington in Seattle.  She was the first Kenneth Ryan Family Planning Fellow in Clinical Care and Research at Columbia University Medical Center and currently serves as co-director of that Fellowship.  After Fellowship, she completed a degree in Public Health at the Mailman School of Public Health. She is an attending at the Title X Family Planning Clinic of the Mailman School of Public Health. In addition, she provides and teaches the full range of family planning services in her practice within the Columbia Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology.  Her current research focuses on contraception for women with epilepsy and use of intrauterine contraception after pregnancy. Dr. Davis has maintained an interest in advocacy for reproductive health throughout her career.  This advocacy includes clinical work directly on behalf of patients, reproductive health research benefitting special populations, and de-stigmatizing reproductive health through teaching.  Since 2009, she has served as Medical Director for Physicians for Reproductive Choice and Health (PRCH).  In that role, she brings an evidence-based physician voice to local and national media as well as policy discussions in Washington and Albany.
Dr. Michael Gittelman

Dr. Michael Gittelman,MD, FAAP

Specialty:
Pediatrics
Grant Year:
2010
Dr. Michael Gittelman, MD, FAAP, is a pediatric emergency room physician at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, Medical Center in Cincinnati, Ohio and an Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics at the University Of Cincinnati School Of Medicine. He completed his undergraduate work at Swarthmore College and his medical school training at the Medical College of Pennsylvania. He completed his residency in Pediatrics at St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children in Philadelphia, PA and a fellowship in Emergency Medicine at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Dr. Gittelman works in the field of injury control. He has long recognized that fulfilling the principles of medical professionalism requires going beyond the traditional scope of practice in order to address the social, economic and political barriers that interfere with the health and wellbeing of our most vulnerable citizens. Dr. Gittelman was a first year fellow in pediatric emergency medicine when he first learned that unintentional injuries were the leading cause of death for young persons in this country. In response, he helped design and implement a mandatory two-week course for all pediatric residents on Injury Prevention and Advocacy. In the thirteen years since, this curriculum has educated countless pediatric residents in the principles of injury prevention and led them to be much more involved in the communities they serve. The American Academy of Pediatrics is currently working to develop a similar program nationally. Dr. Gittelman currently runs the Injury Prevention Program within the Division of Emergency Medicine. He also works with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, conducting the Injury Free Coalition for Kids site work both locally and nationally, and is in the process of building an integrated injury prevention center in Southwest Ohio. In recognition of his work, Dr. Gittelman was appointed the Chairperson of the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Section on Injury, Violence, and Poison Prevention, where he serves nationally as an advocate and educator. Dr. Gittelman has made a powerful impact on his own community, as evidenced by a reduction in injuries by as much as 42% in one of the high-risk areas served by his local Injury Free Coalition. The Injury Free Coalition developed and redesigned areas of the community to support the erection of 6 state-of-the-art playgrounds in Avondale, OH. Furthermore, the Injury Free Coalition built a football stadium and spearheaded the construction of speed bumps in high pedestrian-injury areas. In addition to building infrastructure, Dr. Gittelman’s organization worked with the community to develop after-school programming for at least 150 elementary students per day and a football league for more than 600 youth each year. He also ensures that all graduating pediatricians know how to serve their patients as an advocate. Dr. Gittelman has made an impact on the education of many more pediatricians nationally through his advocacy work within the American Academy of Pediatrics. Furthermore, he demonstrates his deep commitment to improving the health of children by also promoting healthy eating and physical activity as well as safety education. Dr. Gittelman is a true physician advocate who overcomes obstacles and challenges with passion and persistence. We are proud to honor him for his commitment to finding the most effective ways to educate families and providers about preventable injuries and developing the best practices to keep children safe.
XinQi Dong

XinQi Dong,MD, MPH

Specialty:
Geriatrics
Grant Year:
2010
XinQi Dong, MD, MPH, is an Associate Professor of Internal Medicine, Behavioral Sciences and Gerontological Nursing at the Rush University Medical Center. He received his BA from the University of Chicago, his MPH from the University of Illinois at Chicago, his medical degree from Rush Medical College, and his clinical training in internal medicine and geriatric from Yale University Medical Center. Having emigrated from China, Dr. Dong has a long standing interest in human rights issues and social justice for vulnerable populations. Dr. Dong focuses on healthy aging and violence prevention in the communities and works to improve community understanding of the prevention, detection, and intervention strategies for elder abuse. He also works to promote civic engagement to advocate for these issues. Dr. Dong was instrumental in the Chicago Wellbeing Task Force and Legislative Task Force, which helped pass the IL Elder Abuse Act into law. He helped to guide the task force in its efforts to provide educational resources and training to 50,000 city workers, grass-roots organizations, and local social services agencies on the issues of vulnerable seniors and elder abuse. Dr. Dong has partnered with various community organizations, initiated a community advisory board, created an innovative “Saturday with Senior” program to provide health promotion exercise training, and provided relevant advice on community health issues in a column called “Ask Dr. Dong” in a local newspaper. He is actively involved in many other advocacy organizations and continues to work to pass and implement legislative initiatives related to elder abuse. Dr. Dong currently serves as an APSA Congressional Policy Fellow/ Health and Aging Policy Fellow in DC to further advocate for the issues of elder abuse and neglect at the national level. In addition to his advocacy work, Dr. Dong has conducted extraordinarily diverse research, addressing a range of issues that is truly exceptional. His recent research has focused on the epidemiological studies of elder abuse, including overall mortality and cardiovascular related mortality. He has written extensively on psychosocial factors affecting the elderly suffering elder abuse and on the barriers encountered by minorities in the health care system. He highlights the potential of health care professionals to acknowledge and effectively make a positive social impact by addressing this important—but frequently under-acknowledged—issue. Dr. Dong is a true innovator in his advocacy work, and he strives not only to satisfy scientific curiosity, but also to help care for the patient and inform practice and policy changes that ultimately aim to promote health and wellbeing. He has made invaluable contributions to the public good both by bettering the lives of the elderly and by honoring a broad obligation to society that extends far beyond the traditional physician-patient relationship. We are proud to have the opportunity to publicly recognize such important work.
Deborah Frank

Deborah Frank,MD

Specialty:
Pediatrics
Grant Year:
2010
Dr. Deborah Frank, MD, is a Professor of Pediatrics at the Boston University School of Medicine. Dr. Frank received her undergraduate degree from Radcliffe College and earned her MD from Harvard Medical School. She completed her residency at Children’s Hospital in Seattle. Dr. Frank comes from a family of advocates and has welcomed this role since the very beginning of her career. At Harvard Medical School, she was the sole student representative and sole woman on a committee to evaluate psycho-surgery, which a noted neurosurgeon at MGH had suggested was the solution to African American riots. During her training in Seattle, Dr. Frank began her work caring for children with the disorder known then as “Failure to Thrive.” Although at the time it was believed that “Failure to Thrive” was caused by a psychiatric aberration in the mother, Dr. Frank recognized that it was in fact a manifestation of malnutrition and that innumerable children were unnecessarily suffering from one of the most preventable and treatable developmental impairments in the world. Dr. Frank is a true visionary. She founded and continues to direct the “Grow Clinic” at Boston Medical Center, a multidisciplinary specialty clinic where she cares for children who suffer from malnutrition resulting from their family’s lack of access to food. The Grow Clinic has served over 2000 children and has become a national model. Dr. Frank also founded a food pantry at the hospital, which has grown so much that it now serves all families at the BMC, not just those in her clinic. Dr. Frank also serves as the leader of a multisite collaborative now called Children’s HealthWatch. For the past 12 years, this organization has been extremely successful in conducting research on the impact of public policies on young children’s health and development and has disseminated its results to policymakers and advocacy organizations nationwide. Furthermore, Dr. Frank has spoken on these issues to a large number of national conferences, congressional staff briefings, federal agencies, and congressional committees. Recently, Dr. Frank has taken on the issue of the impact of intrauterine cocaine exposure on children, opposing criminal sanctions for women who choose to continue their pregnancies while suffering from an addictive disorder. She has testified in a case that eventually went to the Supreme Court and has become an active teacher and expert in this field. Dr. Frank has contributed to the public good through her tireless advocacy on the part of vulnerable children in underserved families, actively caring for the families she treats in her clinic and diligently campaigning that policymakers do what is right for all children. We are proud to honor Dr. Frank, who brings an admirable personal and professional credibility to the table that allows her to bear witness to the impacts of hunger in a way that few others can.
Michael Fiore

Michael Fiore,MD MPH MBA

Specialty:
Internal Medicine
Grant Year:
2009
Michael Fiore, professor of medicine, founded and has served as Director of the University of Wisconsin Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention (UW-CTRI) since it was established in 1992. He is a clinically active general internist, treating patients for tobacco dependence, a nationally recognized expert on tobacco, and an author of numerous articles, chapters, and books on cigarette smoking. Fiore served as chair of the panel that produced the United States Public Health Service (PHS) Clinical Practice Guideline: Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence, in 2000 which provides a gold standard for healthcare providers. That PHS Guideline was updated and published in 2008 with the simultaneous endorsement of 58 leading medical and public health organizations. He co-directed The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation National Program Offices, Addressing Tobacco in Managed Care and Addressing Tobacco in Healthcare Research Network. Dr. Fiore chaired the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Subcommittee on Tobacco Cessation of the Interagency Committee on Smoking and Health that produced a comprehensive plan for promoting tobacco cessation in the United States. In July 2003, he received an Innovators in Combating Substance Abuse Award from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. In 2005, Dr. Fiore was asked by the United States Justice Department as part of their landmark lawsuit against the tobacco industry to craft a $130 billion, 25-year plan to assist 33 million smokers to quit. Dr. Fiore was co-principal investigator for a five-year NIH-funded Transdisciplinary Tobacco Use Research Center (TTURC) grant designed to understand tobacco dependence in order to prevent relapse to smoking. In September, 2004, he began his role as co-principal investigator of a second TTURC grant, seeking to examine tobacco dependence treatment and outcomes with an eye to determining the effectiveness of various treatments and matching those treatments to smokers wishing to quit. In September 2009, he begins serving as principal investigator for the third NIH P50 grant awarded to UW-CTRI, Engineering Effective Interventions for Tobacco Use: A Translational Laboratory. After graduating from Bowdoin College, Dr. Fiore completed medical school at Northwestern University in Chicago and his internal medicine training at Boston City Hospital. His postgraduate education included a Masters of Public Health from Harvard University. Dr. Fiore received additional training as an Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) Officer for the United States Centers for Disease Control where he also completed a Preventive Medicine residency program at the United States Office on Smoking and Health before coming to the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In 2009, Dr. Fiore earned a Masters degree from the University of Wisconsin School of Business.
Benjamin Hoffman

Benjamin Hoffman,MD

Specialty:
Pediatrics
Grant Year:
2009
Dr. Benjamin Hoffman is a semi-native of New Mexico. After studying anthropology at the University of California Berkeley, he obtained his MD from Harvard Medical School. He completed residency in pediatrics at the Children’s Hospital in Seattle, WA, and spent an additional year as chief resident there. He returned to the New Mexico to work with the Indian Health Service on the Navajo Reservation and spent 4 years there before joining the faculty at the University of New Mexico. He is an associate professor of pediatrics, director of the pediatric residency program, and assistant dean of graduate medical education. Ben has been very involved in child passenger safety in New Mexico at both the community and the legislative levels. He is a NHTSA certified CPS technician instructor, and serves as vice- chair for Safer New Mexico Now, and on the executive committee for the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Violence, Injury and Poison Prevention. Ben is also a passionate advocate for Native American child health. He serves on the AAP’s Committee on Native American Child Health, and has co-chaired the 2nd and 3rd International Meetings on Indigenous Child Health in Montreal (2007) and Albuquerque (2009). In 2001, Ben developed a longitudinal curriculum in community health and advocacy for pediatric residents at the University of New Mexico to insure that the next generation of pediatricians have the knowledge and skills to identify needs and assets of their communities, and are equipped to collaborate effectively to effect change. The PARC (Pediatric Advocacy, Rural and Community) program has become a centerpiece of the training program at UNM and has yielded multiple innovative and effective resident projects that have impacted communities from New Mexico to Africa. Ben is married to Jane Kim-Hoffman, also a pediatrician, and together they have 3 hilarious kids.
Neil Calman

Neil Calman,MD

Specialty:
Internal Medicine
Grant Year:
2008
Dr. Neil Calman began his work as a physician advocate in medical school by reporting unethical and dangerous experiments performed on African-American women. When his complains were ignored, he involved the press; the experiments were stopped, and he was asked to serve on the newly created human experimentation committee. Dr. Calman is the president and co-founder of the Institute for Family Health. Under his leadership, the organization delivered more than 200,000 primary care, mental health and dental visits to more than 70,000 individuals in 2007. Dr. Calman also directed the formation of Bronx Health REACH in 1999, a coalition of 40 organizations dedicated to eliminating the impact of racial disparities on health outcome. Among its many activities, Bronx Health REACH brought more than 500 Bronx residents to Albany to educate 92 legislators about racial disparities in the health care system. Neil Calman, M.D., is a Board Certified family physician who has been practicing in the Bronx and Manhattan for the past 30 years. He is president and a co-founder of the Institute for Family Health. Since 1983 Dr. Calman has led the Institute in developing family health centers in the Bronx and Manhattan, and in establishing training programs that have graduated more than 200 new family doctors with the special skills needed to take care of people in medically underserved communities. Under his leadership, the Institute for Family Health has grown to include more than 100 family physicians, family nurse practitioners, family practice residents and social workers who practice in 16 full time centers, including six in Ulster and Dutchess counties, and eight sites which care for people who are homeless. Dr. Calman has a long history of public service. He has served on many government commissions, including Governor Cuomo’s Health Care Advisory Board, the New York State Council on Graduate Medical Education where he is Chair of the Health Reform and Finance Subcommittee. His is also Chair of the Clinical Committee of the Community Health Care Association of New York State. Dr. Calman is the recipient of three National awards for his work in Public Health: the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Community Health Leadership Award, the American Academy of Family Physicians' Public Health Award and the Pew Charitable Trusts' Primary Care Achievement Award. His work has been documented in three book chapters, Big Doctoring in America: Profiles in Primary Care by Fitzhugh Mullen, MD, To Give Their Gifts: Health, Community and Democracy by Richard A. Couto, and Caring for America by John R. Stanard. Since 1999, Dr. Calman has led a project designed to eliminate racial and ethnic differences in health outcomes in the Bronx, funded by the Centers for Disease Control. He is widely published on issues related to race and health policy, including Out of the Shadow (Health Affairs) Making Health Equality a Reality: The Bronx Takes Action (Health Affairs) and Separate and Unequal Care in New York City (Journal of Health Care Law and Policy.) Dr. Calman is committed to the use of health information technology to improve health outcomes in underserved communities. In 2006, he received the prestigious Physician’s Information Technology Leadership Award, presented annually by the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society, and in 2007, the he accepted the Davies Public Health Award on behalf of the Institute. In June 2008, the Institute for Family Health was awarded a New York Times Company Nonprofit Excellence Award for Excellent Use of Technology and Focus on Mission. Dr. Calman serves on the executive committee of the newly established citywide Primary Care Health Information Consortium, and on the New York State Department of Health’s Information Technology Stakeholder Group Planning Committee. He recently published a chapter titled Electronic Health Records: The Use of Technology to Eliminate Racial Disparities in Health Outcomes (Medical Informatics: An Executive Primer).
Yvette Roubideaux

Yvette Roubideaux,MD MPH

Specialty:
Primary Care
Grant Year:
2008
Organization:
Indian Health Service
Dr. Yvette Roubideaux’s advocacy involves a particularly vulnerable population, American Indians and Alaska Natives. The American Diabetes Association committee she chairs, Awakening the Spirit Team, helped lead efforts to advocate for Congressional reauthorization of the Special Diabetes Program for Indians (SDPI). Dr. Roubideaux, along with her team and its partners, organized letter-writing campaigns, congressional visits and publicity for the program’s success stories that enabled it to be reauthorized several times with increased funding during the past decade. Program spending increased from $30 million in 1997 to $150 million through 2008; the most recent advocacy efforts reauthorized the program at $150 million per year through 2011. Her advocacy efforts have benefited nearly 400 programs by funding diabetes prevention and treatment services in American Indian and Alaska Native communities in 35 states. Yvette Roubideaux, MD, MPH is currently the Director of the Indian Health Service. Before directing IHS, she worked with them as a Medical Officer and Clinical Director on the San Carlos Indian Reservation and in the Gila River Indian Community. Prior to her appointment as IHS Director, she was an Assistant Professor in the College of Medicine at The University of Arizona. Her work included teaching and research on Indian health issues, with a focus on diabetes in American Indians/Alaska Natives and Indian health policy. She is the Co-Director of the Coordinating Center for the Special Diabetes Program for Indians Competitive Demonstration Projects, in which 66 sites are implementing diabetes prevention and cardiovascular disease prevention activities in American Indian and Alaska Native communities. She is also faculty for the Native Investigator Program in the University of Colorado Native Elder Research Center/Resource Center for Minority Aging Research (RCMAR). Dr. Roubideaux served as Chair of the NDEP American Indian Subcommittee (1998-2005), and is the current Chair of the American Diabetes Association Awakening the Spirit Team. She was President of the Association of American Indian Physicians (1999-2000) and was appointed to the DHHS Advisory Committee on Minority Health in 2000. She is co-editor of the APHA book entitled “Promises to Keep: Public Health Policy for American Indians and Alaska Natives in the 21st Century.” Dr. Roubideaux is the Director of the UA/ITCA Indians Into Medicine (INMED) Program and Director of the Student Development Core of the ITCA/UA American Indian Research Center for Health. Dr. Roubideaux received the 2004 Indian Physician of the Year Award from the Association of American Indian Physicians. Dr. Roubideaux received her MD from Harvard Medical School and her MPH from Harvard School of Public Health. She completed the Primary Care Internal Medicine Residency Program at Brigham & Women’s Hospital in Boston, MA. She also completed the Commonwealth Fund/Harvard University Fellowship in Minority Health Policy in 1997.
Lisa Chamberlain

Lisa Chamberlain,MD MPH

Specialty:
Pediatrics
Grant Year:
2008
Lisa Chamberlain, MD, MPH is Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford. Dr. Chamberlain cares for patients in East Palo Alto at the Ravenswood Family Health Center. She founded and is the medical director of the Stanford Pediatric Advocacy Program which oversees community pediatrics and advocacy training for all pediatric residents at Stanford. In 2005 she founded the Stanford Advocacy Track (StAT) which supports a subset of residents interested in pursuing careers to address child health inequity in the United States and abroad. At the Stanford School of Medicine she directs the Scholarly Concentration in Community Health, an area of scholarly focus for medical students interested in health disparities. She is a frequent lecturer in a wide range of settings at Stanford and teaches a popular course on the social and environmental determinants of health. For her work in medical student and resident education she has received two of Stanford’s highest teaching awards. Her research examines access to care for impoverished children in California, focusing on children with chronic illness. She co-leads a statewide collaboration in California, uniting 13 pediatric training programs across the state to develop, strengthen and disseminate community pediatrics and advocacy curriculum. She is co-founder and co-chair of the Speak Up For Kids Advocacy Committee of the AAP, Chapter 1.

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