Past Fellows List

Between 1999 and 2007, the IMAP Physician Advocacy Fellowship program supported the following doctors as they developed or enhanced their advocacy skills by implementing a project in partnership with an advocacy organization. Their diverse projects addressed issues including Medicaid coverage and enrollment, health care access, pediatric oral health, prison health care, and more.

 

 

Scott A Allen MD

Scott A Allen MD, Clinical Professor of Medicine at the School of Medicine, University of California, Riverside

Specialty:

Internal Medicine

Grant Year:

2005

Dr. Allen is a Clinical Professor of Medicine and Associate Dean of Academic Affairs at the School of Medicine at the University of California, Riverside and the founder and Medical Director of the Access Clinic, a primary care medical home for adults with developmental disabilities. Previously, he was the Medical Director for the Rhode Island Department of Corrections. During his years in corrections, he helped to establish a standard for hepatitis C evaluation and treatment in prisons. He continues to be involved as a court expert in litigation involving hepatitis care for the incarcerated population.
For his fellowship project, Dr. Allen worked with Physicians for Human Rights to mobilize the medical community to speak out against the practice of torture by US forces and to help the define the limits of medical professionals' role in and around such acts. Since concluding his fellowship, he has continued to work with PHR on the Campaign against Torture, focusing on rallying the medical community against both torture in general and medical complicity in particular.

Since concluding his fellowship, Dr. Allen co-founded and now co-directs the Center for Prisoner Health and Human Rights at The Miriam Hospital, Brown University. He has also been the lead medical author of three reports by Physicians for Human Rights dealing with torture: "Leave No Marks: Enhanced Interrogations and the Risk of Criminality," and "Aiding Torture: Health Professionals’ Ethics and Human Rights Violations Demonstrated in the May 2004 CIA Inspector General’s Report" and “Experiments in Torture.”He also co-authored a chapter on hunger strikes in Interrogations, Forced Feedings, and the Role of Health Professionals and served as a Task Force member for the IMAP report “Ethics Abandoned: Medical Professionalism and Detainee Abuse in the War on Terror.”

George L Askew MD

George L Askew MD, President and CEO, Jumpstart for Kids

Specialty:

Pediatrics

Grant Year:

2000

George L. Askew, MD, a board certified pediatrician with a longstanding history of innovative work in child and family advocacy and executive leadership, was appointed by the Obama Administration to serve as the first Chief Medical Officer for the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). In this role he provides expert advice and consultation to the Assistant Secretary for Children and Families on the development of programs, policies, and initiatives that address the health needs and strengths of children and families facing our country’s most significant social, economic, and health challenges. This has included: Affordable Care Act education and outreach, the health of victims and survivors of human trafficking, examining the intersection of health outcomes and the social determinants of health, the health and well-being of unaccompanied immigrant children, and the expansion of national service. Dr.Askew is a former Senior Policy Advisor for Early Childhood Health and Development in ACF, where his role was leading and supervising a team of staff working on inter-departmental health-related early childhood initiatives.

Prior to joining HHS he was Deputy CEO and Chief Development Officer for Voices for America’s Children, Founder of Docs For Tots, and former CEO and President of Jumpstart for Young Children. He is an Assistant Clinical Professor of Pediatrics at George Washington University School of Medicine in Washington,DC. Because of his initiative, vision, and national impact, in 2005 Dr. Askew was named an Ashoka International Fellow. He was recognized as a national and global leader for his efforts to link health professionals with early childhood advocacy, embodying the ideals of civic engagement and creative solution-building nurtured by the international fellowship program. Ashoka identifies and supports social entrepreneurs as they catalyze change in their societies.

Oxiris Barbot MD

Oxiris Barbot MD,Commissioner of Health, Baltimore City Health Department

Specialty:

Pediatrics

Grant Year:

2000

Oxiris Barbot, M.D., was appointed Commissioner of Health for Baltimore City on July 7, 2010, by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake. As Commissioner, her priorities include maximizing community engagement, promoting health equity and fostering innovation. She has streamlined the Department’s organizational structure to support work addressing social determinants of health. She has testified before City Council on health disparities, as well as the importance of expanding physical education in Baltimore schools to help address the explosion of childhood obesity. Under her leadership, the Department has expanded the Virtual Supermarket, one of its innovative strategies for increasing access to healthy foods for those living in food deserts. Dr. Barbot also banned the sale of caffeinated alcoholic beverages within Baltimore City limits. In the spring of 2011, she unveiled Healthy Baltimore 2015, a comprehensive health policy agenda that articulates 10 priority areas and leading indicators for action. This plan highlights areas where the largest impact can be made on reducing morbidity and mortality while improving quality of life for all Baltimoreans. Dr. Barbot chairs Baltimore City’s Cross-Agency Health Taskforce.

Dr. Barbot received her bachelor’s from Yale University and holds a medical degree from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. She completed her residency at Children’s National Medical Center in Washington, D.C.. Dr. Barbot has published several articles and has presented on topics including H1N1 response, school health and health coverage for Latinos. Dr. Barbot previously served as medical director of the Office of School Health at the New York City (NYC) Department of Health and Mental Hygiene and Department of Education where she implemented an electronic health record for the City’s 1.1 million public school students. In 2010, Dr. Barbot received the Hispanic Health Leadership Award from the National Hispanic Medical Association.

Heidi Behforouz MD

Heidi Behforouz MD, Attending Physician, Brigham and Women's Hospital

Specialty:

Internal Medicine

Grant Year:

2001

Organization:

Partners in Health

Dr. Behforouz is an attending internist at the Brigham and Women's Hospital and Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School. She is currently Executive Director of the Prevention and Access to Care and Treatment (PACT) project in Boston, Massachusetts. Sponsored by Partners in Health and the Division of Global Health Equity at the Brigham and Women's Hospital, this program employs community health workers (CHWs) to advocate for the health and well-being of inner city residents infected with HIV and other chronic diseases, such as diabetes, cardiovascular and pulmonary disease, and mental illness.

During her IMAP fellowship, Dr. Behforouz developed the PACT care model that has since been cited as an innovative "best practice" by both Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and Health Resources and Service Administration (HRSA). Early data demonstrated improved patient outcomes at reduced cost to Medicaid, suggesting a role for CHWs in primary care transformation. As Medical Director of the Network Health Alliance, Dr. Behforouz has partnered with Bob Master's Commonwealth Care Alliance program to create a community-based intervention to complement the work of clinic-based providers and improve health outcomes and utilization patterns among high-risk Medicaid patients across the state of Massachusetts. The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has adopted the PACT model of care and is hiring CHWs as care coordinators in more than twenty-five public clinics and hospitals serving HIV/AIDS patients in New York City. Dr. Behforouz is a strong advocate for the integration of CHWs into the health care delivery system and enjoys teaching and mentoring students in Social Medicine and health advocacy.

Abraham B. Bergman MD

Abraham B. Bergman MD, Director, Department of Pediatrics, Harborview Medical Center

Specialty:

Pediatrics

Grant Year:

2001

Dr. Bergman is an attending physician at Harborview Medical Center, where he was Chief of Pediatrics from 1983-2002. He retired in 2010, but continues to serve as a volunteer teacher in the pediatric clinic.

He was awarded the IMAP fellowship to assist Washington's Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) make the systemic changes necessary to improve the access to and the quality of health care provided to children in foster care, and to insure that all 0–5 children in foster care have access to early learning/preschool programs. His specific goals were to a) improve access to quality health care by instituting a regionalized case management system; b) overcome the “disconnect” between child welfare and medical care services by creating a coordinated foster care health unit; c) enable physicians to gain access to medical information about foster children under their care; d) carry out quality assurance audits; and e) increase the statewide percentage of 0–5 foster children in Head Start from 3% to 20% in 3 years.

As a result of being awarded an IMAP Fellowship, Dr. Bergman was able to undertake a campaign to improve health services for children in foster care, first in the State of Washington, and then in the United States. The IMAP fellowship served as initial “seed money,” and support was subsequently obtained from the Paul Allen Foundation, the Seattle Foundation, the Norcliffe Foundation and Casey Family Programs. His advocacy efforts resulted in legislation in the State of Washington to create a discreet foster care health unit (2006), contact with Rep. Jim McDermott (D,WA) that led to the enactment of the federal Fostering Connections Act of 2008, and an initiative with Casey Family Programs from 2008-2010 to provide technical assistance to states wishing to improve their foster care health systems.  

Gene Bishop MD

Gene Bishop MD,Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and Physician consultant, Pennsylvania Health Law Project

Specialty:

Internal Medicine

Grant Year:

2001

Dr. Bishop continues to teach internal medicine residents in the outpatient setting at Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia, and works as a physician consultant to the Pennsylvania Health Law Project, her fellowship advocacy organization. The goal of her fellowship project was to identify and reduce the limitations on access to effective health care imposed by the mandatory Medicaid managed care program in Pennsylvania, with a particular focus on the impediments which restricted formularies and prior authorization requirements pose to special needs populations. Her fellowship work was published by the Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured, and is available at http://www.kff.org/medicaid/7297.cfm

Since completing her fellowship, she has collaborated with the Maternity Care Coalition of Philadelphia (MCC) to produce a report “Childbirth at the Crossroads,” which is available at http://www.momobile.org/MaternityCareinSoutheasternPA.html. This has become a blueprint for their advocacy work with local health departments, and the state Department of Public Welfare. She also worked with the MCC to research opportunities to expand Medicaid/health care coverage for maternity care to low income women in Pennsylvania. This report, “Insuring Healthy Births” is available at http://www.momobile.org/MaternityCareinSoutheasternPA.html. Dr. Bishop has also served as physician consultant to the Pennsylvania Health Law Project (PHLP), a statewide legal services organization working solely on issues of health care delivery where she conducted in-depth interviews with uninsured Pennsylvanians calling the PHLP helpline and produced a publication highlighting their stories.

David Buchanan MD

David Buchanan MD, Chief Medical Officer, Erie Family Health Center

Specialty:

Internal Medicine

Grant Year:

2003

Organization:

Interfaith House

Dr. Buchanan is the Chief Medical Officer of the Erie Family Health, a Federally Qualified Health Center in Chicago with nine locations and over fifty providers. He is also an Assistant Professor at Northwestern University. The goal of his fellowship project was to establish Medicaid reimbursement for organizations providing respite services to ill or injured homeless people within Illinois.

Since completing his fellowship, Dr. Buchanan helped organize the Stroger Hospital of Cook County (formerly Cook County Hospital) Medical Staff in a campaign to stop funding cuts for the hospital. The end result was that Cook County raised their sales tax and also set up an independent board to manage the county health system. He has also published two articles, one in the Journal of the American Medical Association and one in The American Journal of Public Health, pertaining to a housing study with the AIDS Foundation of Chicago. Since the study’s publication, Dr. Buchanan’s findings have been mentioned repeatedly in the U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary’s speeches.

Calman, Neil photo

Neil Calman, MD, Chief Medical Officer, Erie Family Health Center

Specialty:

Family Medicine

Grant Year:

2008

Dr. Neil Calman began his work as a physician advocate in medical school by reporting unethical and dangerous experiments performed on African-American women. When his complaints were ignored, he involved the press; the experiments were stopped, and he was asked to serve on the newly created human experimentation committee.

Dr. Calman is the president and co-founder of the Institute for Family Health. Under his leadership, the organization delivered more than 450,000 primary care, mental health and dental visits to more than 92,000 individuals in 2013. Dr. Calman also directed the formation of Bronx Health REACH in 1999, a coalition of 70 organizations dedicated to eliminating the impact of racial disparities on health outcome. Among its many activities, Bronx Health REACH brought more than 500 Bronx residents to Albany to educate 92 legislators about racial disparities in the health care system.

Neil Calman, M.D., is a Board Certified family physician who has been practicing in the Bronx and Manhattan for the past 30 years. He is president and a co-founder of the Institute for Family Health. Since 1983 Dr. Calman has led the Institute in developing family health centers in the Bronx and Manhattan, and in establishing training programs that have graduated more than 200 new family doctors with the special skills needed to take care of people in medically underserved communities. Under his leadership, the Institute for Family Health has grown to include more than 100 family physicians, family nurse practitioners, family practice residents and social workers who practice in 19 full time centers, including six in Ulster and Dutchess counties, and eight sites which care for people who are homeless.

Dr. Calman has a long history of public service. He has served on many government commissions, including Governor Cuomo’s Health Care Advisory Board, the New York State Council on Graduate Medical Education where he is Chair of the Health Reform and Finance Subcommittee. His is also Chair of the Clinical Committee of the Community Health Care Association of New York State. Dr. Calman is the recipient of three National awards for his work in Public Health: the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Community Health Leadership Award, the American Academy of Family Physicians' Public Health Award and the Pew Charitable Trusts' Primary Care Achievement Award. His work has been documented in three book chapters, Big Doctoring in America: Profiles in Primary Care by Fitzhugh Mullen, MD, To Give Their Gifts: Health, Community and Democracy by Richard A. Couto, and Caring for America by John R. Stanard.
Since 1999, Dr. Calman has led a project designed to eliminate racial and ethnic differences in health outcomes in the Bronx, funded by the Centers for Disease Control from 1999 to 2013. He is widely published on issues related to race and health policy, including Out of the Shadow (Health Affairs) Making Health Equality a Reality: The Bronx Takes Action (Health Affairs) and Separate and Unequal Care in New York City (Journal of Health Care Law and Policy.)

Dr. Calman is committed to the use of health information technology to improve health outcomes in underserved communities. In 2006, he received the prestigious Physician’s Information Technology Leadership Award, presented annually by the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society, and in 2007, the he accepted the Davies Public Health Award on behalf of the Institute. In June 2008, the Institute for Family Health was awarded a New York Times Company Nonprofit Excellence Award for Excellent Use of Technology and Focus on Mission. Dr. Calman served on the executive committee of the citywide Primary Care Health Information Consortium, and on the New York State Department of Health’s Information Technology Stakeholder Group Planning Committee. From 2009 to 2014, he served on the National Health Information Policy Panel, and has published a chapter titled Electronic Health Records: The Use of Technology to Eliminate Racial Disparities in Health Outcomes (Medical Informatics: An Executive Primer).

In 2011, the Institute became one of the first Teaching Health Centers in the country, and initiated a family medicine residency program at its brand new Family Health Center of Harlem. In 2012, the Institute partnered with the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai to establish a Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, chaired by Dr. Calman.

Alice Huan-mei Chen MD MPH

Alice Huan-mei Chen MD MPH,Associate Professor of Clinical, UCSF School of Medicine

Specialty:

Internal Medicine

Grant Year:

2002

Dr. Chen is an Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine at UCSF. During her advocacy fellowship, Dr. Chen was a staff physician at Asian Health Services. For her project, she worked in partnership with the Asian Pacific Islander American Health Forum in San Francisco to improve access and quality of care for limited English proficient individuals and communities.

Since completing her fellowship, she has been awarded the Richard J. Haber Excellence in Teaching Award (2006), University of California San Francisco, San Francisco General Hospital Division of General Internal Medicine, the San Francisco Health Plan Award for Innovation in Health Care Service Delivery (2007) and the John F. Murray Award (2008) for academic excellence and humanitarian mission, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco General Hospital Department of Medicine.

Esther K. Chung MD MPH

Esther K. Chung MD MPH,Professor of Pediatrics, Jefferson Medical College and Nemeurs

Specialty:

Pediatrics

Grant Year:

2007

Organization:

Maternity Care Coalition

Dr. Chung is Professor of Pediatrics at Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, PA, and in the Division of General Pediatrics at Jefferson and the Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children/Nemours in Wilmington, Delaware. She is also Director of Advocacy and Community Partnerships for the pediatric residency program, and Director of JeffSTARS, an advocacy curriculum for medical students and residents. She is involved in a number of projects that include advocacy education, campus-community partnerships, and maternal-child health research focusing on families living in poverty. In addition, she is Editor-in-Chief for Visual Diagnosis and Treatment in Pediatrics, with a 3rd edition in progress, and Associate Editor for the first 6 editions of The 5-Minute Pediatric Consult. As an academic generalist, she provides clinical care and teaches medical students and residents in a busy, primary care practice and at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital’s Newborn Nursery, where she serves as the Medical Director.

The goal of Dr. Chung's fellowship project was to reduce barriers to breastfeeding for all women in Southeastern Pennsylvania, particularly low-income, working women. Propelled by the voices of the women in the community, she focused on developing, improving and increasing breastfeeding policies in hospitals, in workplaces, and related to Medicaid. Since completing her fellowship, Dr. Chung has received The Pennsylvania Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics (PA AAP) Special Achievement Award. She also received The Physician of the Year Award from the Professional Resource Organization for Lactation Consultants in recognition of the work that she did during her fellowship to promote and support breastfeeding in the workplace, in hospital settings and among low-income women. These awards signify the tireless efforts of advocates at Maternity Care Coalition who worked collaboratively to promote and support breastfeeding. In 2011, she delivered a Plenary Session, "Raising the Bar while Leveling the Playing Field: Perspectives of a Physician Advocate," at the International Lactation Consultants Association's annual meeting in San Diego, which was attended by over 1000 professionals. She now serves on the Philadelphia Multihospital Breastfeeding Taskforce.

Areas of expertise other than breastfeeding advocacy include maternal child health, adverse childhood experiences, social determinants of health, and children living in poverty. At the state level, she is an Executive Board member of the Pennsylvania Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics. At the national level, Dr. Chung is an active member of the BORN (Better Outcomes Through Research for Newborns) Network Research Committee, Co-Chair of the Academic Pediatric Association’s (APA’s) Newborn Nursery Special Interest Group, and Co-Chair of the Provider-Patient Workgroup under the Healthcare Delivery Committee of the APA’s Taskforce on Childhood Poverty.

Theodore Corbin MD MPP

Theodore Corbin MD MPP, Assistant Professor, Drexel University School of Medicine

Specialty:

Emergency Medicine

Grant Year:

2005

Dr. Corbin is an Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine at Drexel University School of Medicine. For his fellowship, he partnered with the Philadelphia Chapter of Physicians for Social Responsibility to develop and maintain a trauma-informed approach to youth violence prevention, and to improve access to quality care for victims of youth violence.

Robert Crittenden MD

Robert Crittenden MD,Professor, University of Washington School of Medicine

Specialty:

Family Medicine

Grant Year:

2002

Dr. Crittenden works as Senior Health Policy Advisor to the governor of the state of Washington.  He oversees the implementation of the Affordable Care Act in the state, advises the governor and leads the health related agencies in the sub-cabinet.  After coming on board, the state passed Medicaid expansion, rolled out one of the best exchanges in the country, enrolled over 600,000 people and drove the uninsurance rate in the state down by 6% (as of 2014).  He also leads the state’s efforts to improve the delivery of care, improve the health of the public and decrease health care costs.

Dr. Crittenden worked as a family physician in Central and Southeast Seattle with urban, underserved patients for 38 years. His fellowship project built on the upswing in concern for access and the costs of health care and focused on ensuring that the people of the state can access health coverage and health services and that the safety net expands and is available for people in need of it.


On completing his fellowship, Dr. Crittenden developed the Herndon Alliance, which was the main national coalition focusing on messaging for groups working on reform. It was a 200 organization coalition that was involved in all of the health care messaging battles over eight years – four before passage, and four after focused on making the reforms permanent. The coalition developed the case for positive messaging for including and encouraging the majority of voters to support health reform and the response to the opposition critiques. 

Michele David MD MBA MPH

Michele David MD MBA MPH,Assistant Professor of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine

Specialty:

Internal Medicine

Grant Year:

2006

Organization:

Health Care for All

Dr. David is an Associate Professor of Medicine at the Boston University School of Medicine, a staff physician with the Section of General Internal Medicine, Co-Director of the Haitian Health Institute at Boston Medical Center and Director of Community Health Programs at Boston University, Center of Excellence in Women’s Health. She is a faculty member for the preventive medicine residency program at Boston Medical Center. Dr. David has focused her career on addressing issues of immigrant health and cross-cultural medicine.

The goal of Dr. David’s fellowship project was to advocate on the issue of racial and ethnic disparities in health care, specifically in Massachusetts, with a focus on disparities affecting the Commonwealth's Haitian population.

In 2007, during her fellowship, Dr. David was appointed by Governor Deval Patrick to the Massachusetts Public Health Council, the policy arm of the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. She represents Boston Medical Center on the Statewide Disparities Council. She was recently awarded the 2010 Harvard School of Public Health William A. Hinton Award in recognition of her many years of activism, commitment to public health and tireless work to educate others in order that they may better understand, promote and support efforts to eliminate health inequities.

Davis, Anne photo

Anne Davis, MD Associate Professor, Obstetrics and Gynecology at Columbia University Medical Center

Specialty:

Gynecology

Grant Year:

2011

Dr. Davis is an Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Columbia University Medical Center. She practices gynecology with an emphasis on abortion and contraception, especially for women with complex medical problems, serves as the Family Planning Fellowship Director and conducts research in contraception and abortion. She recently was awarded a grant by the Society of Family Planning for research and Mentorship (2014-2015).

Dr. Davis has been an active advocate for comprehensive reproductive health for more than a decade. She served on the board of Physicians for Reproductive Health (PRH) for six years and became their first consulting Medical Director in 2011. Her advocacy activities with PRH include lobbying in Albany and Washington DC, writing numerous letters to the editor, authoring testimony, assisting with amicus briefs and speaking about reproductive health on major news media outlets such as CNN, MSNBC, NPR and AP. Dr. Davis is a strong supporter of abortion rights and access to contraception and mentors many young physicians interested in reproductive health advocacy.

Dr. Anne Davis attended Cornell University and received a BA in psychology in 1988. She obtained an MD from the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1993 followed by a residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Washington completed in 1997. She was the first to complete a Fellowship in Family Planning and Research at Columbia University from 1997 to 1999 and received a Masters in Public Health in 2001 form the Columbia Mailman School of Public health.

 

Mark Earnest MD PhD

Mark Earnest MD PhD, Professor of Medicine – University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Specialty:

Internal Medicine

Grant Year:

2002

The goal of his fellowship project was to find and articulate compelling and provocative stories that illustrated the dilemmas of inadequate access to medical care, to present those stories to the communities of Colorado through print and broadcast media, and direct presentations to community stakeholders, in order to increase public awareness and create a grassroots political base for policy changes advocated by the Colorado Coalition for the Medically Underserved.

Since completing his fellowship, Dr. Earnest led the creation of the LEADS (Leadership Education Advocacy Scholarship) Program, a leadership and advocacy track within the school of medicine. Approximately one sixth of every class has participated in the LEADS coursework and 10% of the students have completed all elements of the track. A key feature of the track is an 8-week service-learning project that involves a partnership between faculty, students and an organization in the community for successful completion. The program serves as a nexus between the campus and the community. Through this program, LEADS faculty and students, in partnership with individuals and agencies in the community have contributed to a broad variety of efforts to improve the health of Coloradans. The LEADS program also runs an ongoing seminar series for the whole campus that features “hot topics” and highlights the efforts of leaders to address the issues raised in the seminar series.

Dr. Earnest is also the Director of Interprofessional Education at the University of Colorado's Anschutz Medical Campus. In that role, he oversees the development of the interprofessional education program which trains all health professions students for competencies in interprofessional collaboration.  He serves on the Board of the American Interprofessional Health Collaborative and the World Coordinating Committee for Interprofessional Education as well as several formal and informal workforce policy groups.  In July 2014, he was appointed interim head of the Division of General Internal Medicine at the University of Colorado.  

Steven G. Federico MD

Steven G. Federico MD, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, University of Colorado

Specialty:

Pediatrics

Grant Year:

2006

Steven G. Federico, MD, is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and Denver Health Medical Center. Dr. Federico is currently the medical director of School Based Health Centers at Denver Health. He received his undergraduate and medical degrees from the University of Arizona. He completed his training in Pediatrics and a Primary Care Research Fellowship at the University of Colorado and a Physician Advocacy Fellowship through the Institute for Medicine as a Profession.

His advocacy work has focused on eliminating the barriers to adequate health coverage faced by children and families. His primary goal has been to improve the enrollment of eligible children in Denver onto Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program. He is currently the President of the Colorado Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics. He shares his experiences as a physician advocate via a course for medical students designed to build leadership and advocacy skills.

He considers himself an advocate for all children but has focused specifically on the underserved. He is a native Spanish-speaker which affords him additional insight into the lives of the multi-cultural families he cares for. Steve shares his passion for serving children with his wife Monica, a Pediatric Pulmonologist at The Children’s Hospital. They spend their time together enjoying the outdoors with their children Ana, Alex and Gabi.

Kathleen Figaro MD MS

Kathleen Figaro MD MS, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Vanderbilt University

Specialty:

Internal Medicine

Grant Year:

2007

Dr. Figaro is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Vanderbilt University and a physician at the Nashville Veterans’ Administration. For her fellowship, she collaborated with the Tennessee Justice Center to respond to the massive disenrollment of many of Tennessee’s most vulnerable patients from TennCare, the state-funded Medicaid program. She developed a new Clinical Advocacy Network where she built a coalition of physician advocates and grassroots organizations to respond to the crisis, and worked to increase both access to health coverage and the quality of care for chronically ill Tennesseans.

Michael Fine MD

Michael Fine MD, Physician-in-Chief, Department of Family Community Medicine, Rhode Island Hospital

Specialty:

Family Medicine

Grant Year:

2000

Dr. Fine is a family physician who divides his time between practices in urban Pawtucket, Rhode Island, and rural Scituate, Rhode Island. For his fellowship, he worked with the Rhode Island American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) to establish the Center for Occupational Health of Rhode Island and collaborated with the Scituate Health Plan Committee to design the financing and service-delivery infrastructure of the Scituate Health Plan, one of the first population-based primary care plans in the US.

Patricia J Flanagan MD

Patricia J Flanagan MD, Professor of Pediatrics, Brown University

Specialty:

Pediatrics

Grant Year:

2003

Organization:

RI KIDSCOUNT

Dr. Flanagan is Professor of Pediatrics on the Teacher-Scholar Track at Brown University and Chief of Clinical Affairs at Hasbro Children's Hospital. During her fellowship, she worked with RI KIDSCOUNT (a children's policy organization that uses research and data to drive policy initiatives). The goal of her project was to engage multiple stakeholders in policy setting to develop and finance an integrated, comprehensive approach to expanding opportunities and improving quality of care for Rhode Island's most disadvantaged infants and toddlers (birth to age three).

Since completing her fellowship, she has established a required one month rotation for Pediatric Interns at Rhode Island Hospital called "Child Health in the Community,” and started a Scholarly Concentration in Advocacy and Activism for undergraduate medical students. She is currently working on transforming a statewide coalition on teen pregnancy into a staffed statewide organization for the prevention of teen pregnancy, an organization called "Blue Line-Preventing Teen Pregnancies and Empowering Young Families.

Kenneth L Fox MD

Kenneth L Fox MD, Staff Physician, Erie Family Health Center

Specialty:

Pediatrics

Grant Year:

1999

Organization:

Partners in Health

Dr. Fox is a Staff Physician at Erie Family Health Center and Assistant Clinical Professor of Pediatrics Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine. During his Fellowship, he was an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Boston University School of Medicine.

For his fellowship project, Dr. Fox identified and trained a group of urban minority youth for leadership roles in violence prevention and human rights in collaboration with Partners in Health and collaborated with Physicians for Human Rights to advocate for better health care for individuals in the juvenile justice system.

 

Frank, Deborah Photo

Deborah A. Frank MD

Specialty:

Pediatrics

Grant Year:

2010

Organization:

Children's Health Watch

Dr. Frank, a graduate of Harvard Medical School, founded Children’s Health Watch in 1998 (formerly Children’s Sentinel Nutrition Assessment Program, C-SNAP). With colleagues across the country she is one of the principal investigators of this ongoing effort to produce non-partisan, original and policy-relevant research on health of infants, toddlers, and preschoolers, whose needs are often not promptly identified in government research programs. Children’s Health Watch works to improve young children’s nutrition, health, and development by informing policies that could address and alleviate their families’ economic hardships.  She has received NIH evaluate the long term outcomes of children with and without intrauterine exposure to cocaine and other substances.

Cited as a respected authority in her fields, Dr. Frank has frequently given testimony to state and federal legislative committees on   the growing problem of hunger and associated hardships in the United States and its effects on our youngest children. She has recently been nominated   by Leader Nancy Pelosi to the newly established National Commission on Hunger.

In 2010 Dr. Frank received the Massachusetts Health Council Outstanding Leadership Award and the Physician Advocacy Merit Award from the Institute on Medicine as a Profession at Columbia University. In 2011 she became the inaugural incumbent of a newly established   Pediatric Professorship in Child Health and Well Being at Boston University School of Medicine

She received the Robert F. Kennedy Children’s Action Corps’ Embracing the Legacy Award on June 3, 2014, 2014   American Medical Association Dr. Debasish Mridha Spirit of Medicine Award on June 6, 2014, and the Congressional Hunger Center’s Bill Emerson and Mickey Leland Award on June  24, 2014.

Jessie M. Gaeta MD

Jessie M. Gaeta MD,Internist, Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program

Specialty:

Internal Medicine

Grant Year:

2005

Dr. Gaeta is an internist with Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program, providing primary care in area shelters, including Saint Francis House, where she is currently Medical Director, and Father Bill's Place. For her fellowship, she worked with the Massachusetts Housing and Shelter Alliance to advocate for and develop statewide Housing First programs that are tailored to the needs of chronically homeless persons. This work entailed raising public awareness of the public health implications of homelessness and the cost-effectiveness of a supportive Housing First approach, convincing state lawmakers to appropriate resources through the budget for this model, and designing a pilot Housing First model that is targeted to improve health outcomes.

Mike Gittelman, MD

Mike Gittelman, MD, Professor, Clinical Pediatrics, Division of Emergency Medicine at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital

Specialty:

Pediatric Emergency Medicine

Grant Year:

2010

Mike Gittelman, MD, is a pediatric emergency room physician at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital and he is a Professor of Clinical Pediatrics at the University Of Cincinnati School Of Medicine.

His area of expertise is within the field of injury control. Prior to their formation of a Council, he served as the Chairperson for the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Section on Injury and Poison Prevention. He is a Board Member of the AAP’s Ohio Chapter, and he is a Co-Director of the Comprehensive Children’s Injury Center at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital. He is involved in resident education on injury prevention and he works with high-risk communities in an effort to reduce pediatric injuries.  One of his research interests has been to study the impact of an ER encounter on promoting a behavior change to prevent injuries. More recently he has worked with the Ohio Chapter to develop a state-wide bicycle helmet intervention and to develop an injury QI program for pediatricians.

Marji Gold MD

Marji Gold MD,Professor of Family and Social Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center

Specialty:

Family Medicine

Grant Year:

2000

Dr. Gold is a Professor of Family and Social Medicine and the Director of the Center for Reproductive Health in Family Medicine at Montefiore Medical Center. For her fellowship project, she worked with NARAL New York in order to increase women's access to abortion and emergency contraception by integrating training in first trimester abortions and emergency contraception into family medical residency programs.

After completing her fellowship, Dr. Gold became Director of the Center for Reproductive Health Education in Family Medicine (RHEDI) in 2004. She has worked successfully to fund 20 family medicine residency programs, each now training 8-13 residents a year in comprehensive first trimester abortion care. She also directed a RHEDI initiative to enhance and expand family medicine residents’ experience with IUD insertion. As a result, the rate of IUD insertions has increased dramatically, and thus women’s access to IUDs has also increased. Since 2008, she has been involved in a project sponsored by the NYC Department of Health to increase contraceptive adherence by teens in school-based health centers (SBHC). This program includes in-service training of all staff in the SBHCs and a referral site so that the SBHC staff can refer teens who want IUDs to Dr. Gold’s primary care clinic. The interest and uptake of this safe and effective method has increased and hopefully will play a role in decreasing unwanted teen pregnancy.

Robert L Goodman MD

Robert L Goodman MD,Founder and Director, No Free Lunch

Specialty:

Internal Medicine

Grant Year:

2001

Dr. Goodman is a general internist practicing in New York City. For his fellowship, he worked with Public Citizen's Health Research Group in Washington, DC and the Center for Medical Consumers in New York, NY to minimize the influence of commercial interests, especially those of the pharmaceutical industry, in medical education and training.

Dr. Goodman founded and currently directs No Free Lunch (nofreelunch.org) a non-profit organization that works to promote clinical practices that are not influenced by pharmaceutical promotion.

Jeffrey Kaczorowski MD

Jeffrey Kaczorowski MD,Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Rochester

Specialty:

Pediatrics

Grant Year:

2004

Organization:

The Children's Agenda

Jeffrey Kaczorowski, M.D. is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Rochester in Rochester, New York. For his fellowship project, he worked with The Children's Agenda, a local advocacy organization that promotes research–based change for the health and well-being of children in the greater Rochester community, in order to advocate for a nurse visitation program to prevent child abuse in Rochester, NY.

After completing his fellowship, Dr. Kaczorowski became the part-time Executive Director of The Children's Agenda. His other recent accomplishments include championing and catalyzing the Rochester community to initiate the Nurse Family Partnership (NFP) program. NFP has grown steadily since its inception in 2005 and is now serving 300 families in the Rochester community. Funding for the program over the past four years has grown from $300,000 per year to over $1.2 million per year. Dr. Kaczorowski has also led national efforts to train pediatrics residents in community health and advocacy as principal investigator and director of the American Academy of Pediatrics Community Pediatrics Training Initiative. Finally, he has led advocacy efforts that caused an increased public investment of $9 million in 2009 to allow 1,000 children of working, poor parents access to child care in Rochester/Monroe County.

Jennifer Kasper MD MPH

Jennifer Kasper MD MPH,Instructor in Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School

Specialty:

Pediatrics

Grant Year:

2000

Dr. Kasper is on faculty at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, in the Division of Pediatric Global Health. She is also on the Board of Doctors of Global Health. The goal of her fellowship project was to engage in research on the health and well being of poor children in immigrant families in the United States in the context of federal and state hunger and welfare policy, and link the criteria contained in the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child with community-based educational initiatives and advocacy.

Since completing her fellowship, she has created a curriculum and overseas clinical experiences for residents, taught medical students through the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School, and mentored medicine and pediatric residents who are creating a handbook for use by residents and local health professionals overseas. She recently completed a book chapter on Doctors for Global Health’s work Applying Liberation Medicine and Accompanying Communities’ Struggles toward Health and Social Justice for U.S. Health Internationalists, Abroad and at Home (in press). She also recently participated in the WHO’s Consultative Meeting, where she helped write new guidelines for the prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV.

Allen S. Keller MD

Allen S. Keller MD, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine, New York University School of Medicine

Specialty:

Internal Medicine

Grant Year:

2000

Organization:

Human Rights First

Dr. Allen Keller is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at New York University School of Medicine and Director of the Bellevue/NYU Program for Survivors of Torture. For his fellowship, Dr. Keller worked with Human Rights First (formerly the Lawyers Committee for Human Rights). He conducted a ground-breaking study, in collaboration with Physicians for Human Rights, documenting mistreatment and poor health, particularly mental health, of asylum seekers in U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) detention. He also participated in a number of training initiatives for health professionals and attorneys working with asylum seekers.

Keller, David photo

David Keller MD, Professor of Clinical Pediatrics, University of Massachusetts Medical School

Specialty:

Pediatrics

Grant Year:

2007

Organization:

Health Law Advocates

David Keller, M.D. is Professor and the first Vice Chair for Clinical Affairs and Clinical Transformation of the Department of Pediatrics of the University of Colorado School of Medicine and Colorado Children’s Hospital, a newly created position responsible for leading initiatives to improve practice efficiency and effectiveness, developing the capacity of the faculty to provide high-quality care in a population health environment and developing innovative collaborations to improve the health of children in a rapidly changing health care system.  Prior to moving to Colorado, he was Clinical Professor of Pediatrics and Senior Policy Analyst at Commonwealth Medicine’s Center for Healthcare Policy and Research at UMass Medical School and Associate Medical Director for the Office of Clinical Affairs at MassHealth, the Massachusetts Medicaid Agency.   He served as Project co-Director of the Rhode Island Chronic Care Sustainability Initiative (an all-payer medical home transformation project), faculty of the Massachusetts Patient-Centered Medical Home Initiative’s Learning Collaborative and team lead for the evaluation of the Massachusetts CHIPRA Quality Measure Project.

From 1991 to 2007, Dr. Keller was Medical Director of South County Pediatrics, a community-based teaching practice and “Medical Home” for children with special health care needs.  He was the founding Medical Director of Family Advocates of Central Massachusetts, a medical-legal partnership addressing the social determinants of health in practices throughout Central Massachusetts, and serves on the Medical Advisory Board of the National Center for Medical-Legal Partnerships.  For his fellowship, Dr. Keller worked with Health Law Advocates and the Worcester Mental Health Network to facilitate the implementation of the Children's Behavioral Health Initiative and the passage of the Omnibus Children's Mental Health Reform Act, which have begun the process of creating an integrated mental health system for children in Massachusetts. He then served as a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health Policy Fellow in the office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation at HHS in 2010.   

Dr. Keller is an Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics and had serves as a District CATCH Facilitator and a member of the Council on Community Pedaitrics.  He is Immediate Past President of the Academic Pediatric Association and a member of HRSA’s Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry.

 

David M. Krol MD MPH FAAP

David M. Krol MD MPH FAAP, Senior Program Officer, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Specialty:

Pediatrics

Grant Year:

2002

Dr. David Krol, a pediatrician, is a Senior Program Officer at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Prior to joining the Foundation, David was an Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Toledo College of Medicine.

For his fellowship, Dr. Krol worked to improve the oral health of low income and minority children by translating policymaker awareness into action and engaging pediatricians and family practitioners in advocating for children's oral health. This involved developing and promoting a model for the interface between primary care medicine and primary care dentistry for low income children. It also involved educating physicians about the importance of children's oral health and advocating for increasing the level of oral-health education in medical education and improving the oral-health skills of practicing pediatricians and other non-dental health professionals. In addition, Krol attempted to create and institute specific opportunities to engage pediatricians and family practitioners to advocate for Medicaid Early Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment (EPSDT) and State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) dental program improvements.

Dr. Krol’s work contributed to the commitment of the American Academy of Pediatrics to make oral health part of their agenda. Dr. Krol has served as a representative to the American Dental Association evidence based panels on fluoride supplementation, fluoride in infant formula, and the ADA Summit on Improving Access to Dental Care. He also served on the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Oral Health Access to Services

Robert J. Master MD

Robert J. Master MD, Associate Professor, Boston University School of Public Health

Specialty:

Internal Medicine

Grant Year:

2003

Bob Master is a practicing physician, board-certified in Internal Medicine with over twenty-five years of experience in the clinical management of patients with advanced chronic illness and disability. For his fellowship, he worked with Community Catalyst to develop a state-wide consumer-governed health plan that is focused on the needs of vulnerable populations such as frail elders and children with special health care needs.

Eduardo R. Ochoa, Jr., MD

Eduardo R. Ochoa, Jr., MD, Assistant Professor, Maternal and Child Health. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

Specialty:

Pediatrics

Grant Year:

2000

Dr. Ochoa is a pediatrician and an expert in reaching out to the Latino community. He is the Assistant Dean for Minority Affairs and an Associate Professor at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences College of Public Health. For his fellowship project, he worked with Arkansas Advocates for Children to assess the needs for access to health care, disease prevention, health promotion and health education among Hispanic families in Arkansas, with special emphasis on children and to set the stage for long-term solution to the challenges posed to public health by the newest arrivals to our state.

Since completing his fellowship, Dr. Ochoa was elected President of Arkansas Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics in 2007. He also recently established ties with a state commission to launch state-based health disparities research that led to two major studies and reports on the state of health disparities in Arkansas. Some of this work was published in a fall 2009 supplement to Pediatrics.

Jerome A. Paulson

Jerome A. Paulson, FAAP Professor, Departments of Pediatrics and Environmental & Occupational Health, George Washington University Schools of Medicine and Public Health

Specialty:

Pediatrics

Grant Year:

2001

Dr. Paulson is a Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the George Washington University School of Medicine & Health Sciences and a Professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health at the GW Milken Institute School of Public Health.. For his fellowship project, he worked in Washington, DC with the Children's Environmental Health Network to increase opportunities for scientific and medical professionals to become actively engaged in children's environmental health policy advocacy at the state and federal level. Since completing his fellowship, Dr. Paulson was appointed as Medical Director for National and Global Affairs, Child Health Advocacy Institute at Children’s National Medical Center, Washington, DC. He is also the director of the Mid-Atlantic Center of Children’s Health and the Environment, one of 10 pediatric environmental health specialty Units in the US.  Dr Paulson served on the Pediatric Medical Care Committee of the National Commission on Children and Disasters and was part of the National Conversation on Public Health and Chemical Exposures organized by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). In 2007, he was appointed to the Committee on Environmental Health of the American Academy of Pediatrics and subsequently elected chair. He served 6 years on the Environmental Protection Agency’s Children’s Health Protection Advisory Committee. Dr Paulson was elected to the American Pediatric Society in 2011. In 2013, he delivered the 11th Annual George J. Ginandes, M.D. Visiting Lecture in Pediatrics at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY.

Monica E. Peek MD MPH

Monica E. Peek MD MPH, Assistant Professor, University of Chicago

Specialty:

Internal Medicine

Grant Year:

2001

Dr. Peek is a general internist with interests and experience in public health initiatives and research. Her focus has been on the access of medically underserved populations to comprehensive health care, and the empowerment of African-American patients within the health care system. She is currently an Assistant Professor at the University of Chicago and an attending physician at John Stroger Hospital (formerly Cook County Hospital).

For her fellowship, Dr. Peek worked in Chicago with the Breast Cancer Awareness and Advocacy Project of Chicagoland Y-Me to develop advocacy skills among uninsured, low-income women of color who have historically not accessed routine preventive health care including breast cancer screening services.

Katie Plax MD

Katie Plax MD, Pediatrician, St. Louis Children's Hospital Adolescent Center

Specialty:

Pediatrics

Grant Year:

2001

Dr. Plax is a pediatrician at St. Louis Children’s Hospital Adolescent Center. Her fellowship project used a faith-based organizing approach to assure quality accessible healthcare for all people in the St. Louis Metropolitan area. By working with Metropolitan Congregations United, she developed and ensured the success of the Kids Can't Wait campaign, a collaborative community organizing effort to make it easier for children to enroll in Medicaid in the state of Missouri.

After completing her fellowship, she joined the Center on Medicine as a Profession Physician Advocacy Fellowship Advisory Board in August 2005. She has recently played a role in opening a new youth center in St. Louis that relies on partnership with many local, state and federal agencies in addition to community partners. This effort required raising millions of dollars and working with political leaders to support the plan. She has also been involved in improving care to youth in foster care and was recently appointed to a state committee on this issue.

Kyran Quinlan MD MPH

Kyran Quinlan MD MPH,Associate Professor, The University of Chicago

Specialty:

Pediatrics

Grant Year:

2007

Dr. Quinlan is an Associate Professor in Pediatrics at the University of Chicago. As a fellow from 2007-2009, he worked with the Active Transportation Alliance to empower impoverished Chicago communities to make their streets safer for pedestrians. He continues to work with residents in Woodlawn, a community in the South Side, to install effective "traffic calming" measures in an identified pedestrian "hot spot," and is expanding his efforts to improve pedestrian safety in low-income areas throughout the city.

Since completing his fellowship, Dr. Quinlan has received Safe Routes to School funding for changing the streets and implementing traffic calming around the school targeted by his fellowship. He has also been active as the Co-Chair of the Mayor’s Pedestrian Advisory Council for Chicago, and is working on bringing greater involvement and engagement with low income communities. He also contributed to the recently published American Academy of Pediatrics' Pedestrian Policy Statement by recommending an increased focus on low income communities, including prioritization of Safe Routes to School funds.

Josiah Rich MD MPH

Josiah Rich MD MPH, Professor of Medicine and Community Health, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

Specialty:

Internal Medicine

Grant Year:

2004

Josiah D. Rich, MD, MPH is Professor of Medicine and Community Health at Brown Medical School and Attending Physician at The Miriam Hospital in Providence, Rhode Island since 1994. He is a practicing internist and an infectious disease specialist. He provides medical care both at The Miriam Hospital Immunology Center and at the Rhode Island State Correctional Facility where he provides infectious disease sub-specialty care. Dr. Rich's research is on the overlap between infectious diseases and illicit substance use. He is the Principal or Co-investigator on several research grants involving the treatment and prevention of HIV infection. Dr. Rich has advocated for public health policy changes to improve the health of people with addiction, including improving legal access to sterile syringes and increasing drug treatment for incarcerated populations.

He is Director and Co-Founder, along with Dr. Scott Allen, of the Center for Prisoner Health and Human Rights at The Miriam Hospital Immunology Center, www.prisonerhealth.org, and has worked in the correctional setting doing research and providing clinical care for over seventeen years. He has also advocated for appropriate public health policy changes to improve the health of marginalized populations and, in particular, incarcerated, formerly incarcerated, and addicted populations. Dr Rich has extensive expertise in the care and prevention of disease in addicted and incarcerated individuals and his understanding of the importance of strong linkages between the correctional and substance abuse treatment systems. For the past 17 years, he has had a weekly clinic at the Rhode Island Department of Corrections caring for prisoners with HIV infection. 

Deborah Ann Richter MD

Deborah Ann Richter MD, Family Physician, Cambridge Health Center

Specialty:

Family Medicine

Grant Year:

2003

Dr. Richter practices family medicine in rural Vermont. The goal of her fellowship project was to educate the business community about the benefits and direct cost savings of establishing a universal health care system for the state of Vermont.

After completing her fellowship, Dr. Richter co-authored At the Crossroads:The Future of Health Care in Vermont (2005) which became the basis for the 2005 health care legislation that was passed by the House and Senate. Unfortunately, it was vetoed by Vermont’s Governor. She also co-authored Gridlock: The Unhealthy Politics of Health Care in Vermont (2009). She has also testified in the legislature dozens of times, given over 400 talks to various business, medical and advocacy organizations around the state. The most recent development has been the website for Vermont Health Care for All - http://www.vermontforsinglepayer.org

Michael Rowland MD MPH

Michael Rowland MD MPH, Medical Director, Maine Migrant Health Program

Specialty:

Family Medicine

Grant Year:

2006

Dr. Michael Rowland is Medical Director of the Maine Migrant Health Program in Augusta, Maine, as well as the Medical Director and founder of Swift River Occupational Health, and the Medical Director at the NewPage Paper Mill. For his fellowship, he worked with the Maine Migrant Health Program to improve working conditions for migrant and seasonal farmworkers through safety intervention, education, and policy change.

Megan Sandel MD MPH

Megan Sandel MD MPH, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Boston University School of Medicine

Specialty:

Pediatrics

Grant Year:

2002

Dr. Sandel is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Boston University School of Medicine. Her fellowship project had three main goals for its work with the Committee for Boston Public Housing: create enhanced transfer screening criteria and procedures to reasonably accommodate tenants with health emergencies; develop recommendations and guidelines regarding the Boston Housing Authority's approach to maintenance and repairs; and provide education and advocacy to residents to empower them to create a healthy home.

Since completing her fellowship, Dr. Sandel has developed the Breathe Easy at Home program which partners with Boston Inspectional Services and the Boston Public Health Commission to improve housing code compliance for city residents with asthma. Doctors can now refer families directly from their office to get housing code inspections and receive email updates from results of the inspections. This program won an Environmental Protection Agency National Environmental Leadership in Asthma Award. Dr. Sandel is also currently the Medical Director of the National Center for Medical Legal Partnership. Now in almost 80 partnerships serving close to 200 hospitals and community health centers, the Medical Legal Partnership effectively addresses legal needs in the health care setting.

 

Dean Schillinger MD

Dean Schillinger MD,Professor of Medicine, University of California at San Francisco

Specialty:

Primary Care

Grant Year:

2002

Organization:

California Literacy

Dean Schillinger, M.D. is Professor of Medicine in Residence at the University of California San Francisco, and Chief of the UCSF Division of General Internal Medicine at San Francisco General Hospital (SFGH). He is a practicing primary care physician at SFGH, an urban public hospital, where he sees patients, teaches in the primary care residency program, and conducts research. In his prior administrative roles, he has directed the Medi-Cal managed care clinic at SFGH, the General Medicine Clinic at SFGH, and has been the Director of Clinical Operations for the Department of Medicine. Dr. Schillinger also serves as Chief of the Diabetes Prevention and Control Program for the California Department of Public Health.

Author of over 130 scientific manuscripts, Dr. Schillinger carries out research related to healthcare for vulnerable populations, and is an internationally recognized expert in health communication science. His work focuses on literacy, health communication, and chronic disease prevention and management. He has carried out a number of studies exploring the impact of limited health literacy on the care of patients with diabetes and heart disease and has developed and evaluated communication programs tailored to the literacy and language needs of patients with chronic disease. In 2000, he completed an Open Society Institute Advocacy Fellowship working with California Literacy, Inc., a non-profit educational organization that helps people gain literacy skills, to advance the California Health Literacy Initiative.

Janet Shalwitz MD

Janet Shalwitz MD, Director of Health Policy, Coleman Advocates

Specialty:

Pediatrics

Grant Year:

2001

Organization:

Coleman Advocates

Dr. Shalwitz is the Director of Healthy Policy for Coleman Advocates, a prominent San Francisco child advocacy organization and the Director of the Adolescent Health Working Group (AHWG), a community collaborative committed to improving adolescents' access to quality health programs and services. For her fellowship, she worked with The Adolescent Health Working Group was to increase young people's access to youth-oriented and culturally competent health services. She also worked with medical providers and students/trainees throughout California to increase awareness of and adherence to adolescent consent and confidentiality laws, and to significantly improve their communication and clinical practice skills with youth.

Kirk L. Smith MD PhD

Kirk L. Smith MD PhD,Arnold P. Gold Associate Professor of Medicine, University of Texas

Specialty:

Family Medicine

Grant Year:

2004

Dr. Smith is the Arnold P. Gold Assistant Professor of Family Medicine at the University of Texas. For his project, he collaborated with Proyecto Digna, Inc., an advocacy organization based in Cameron Park, Texas, in order to mobilize the community through an advocacy program that included the following elements: identifying salient health-care needs, identifying public health programs and policies relevant to these needs, identifying specific barriers to access, communicating to the public (and the public's representatives) factors impeding healthcare access, and implementing proposals to remove barriers and maximize health-care resources for the community.

Since completing his fellowship, Dr. Smith has acquired funding from the University of Texas system to establish a multi-institutional medical school curriculum based upon the Community Service Learning used by the Frontera de Salud student volunteer program. In 2009, he received six million dollars from the Texas legislature in support of his community-based chronic disease prevention and control programs focused on underserved communities. Over the last two years, the Frontera program expanded to include service sites throughout Galveston, Bexar, Cameron, Nueces, and Webb Counties, with new chapters and affiliates at University of Texas Health Science Center-Houston joining the established chapters in Galveston and San Antonio and the addition of nursing and health professions student volunteers. In 2009, he also established a formal affiliation with the Peking Health Science Center Institute for the Medical Humanities and China-US Center for Medical Professionalism in Beijing.

Michelle Terry MD

Michelle Terry MD, Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine

Specialty:

Pediatrics

Grant Year:

2005

Organization:

The Children's Alliance

Dr. Terry is a Clinical Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Washington. For her fellowship, she worked with the Children's Alliance to advocate for a system whereby all the mothers of infants in King County, Washington will be enrolled in maternity support services and will receive home visits by public health nurses.

Since completing her fellowship, Dr. Terry has served as a Medical Consultant to Washington State’s Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) in order to improve quality of medical care and medical services for children in foster care. She has also developed a structure for nurse care coordinators at Seattle Children's Hospital to notify appropriate regional medical consultant at DSHS about hospitalization of child in state care. In this way, medical consultants can initiate conversation with a child's social worker regarding the child's ongoing medical needs. Dr. Terry also chairs African-American Mentoring Network at University of Washington School of Medicine, which links community physicians to African-American medical students to support their activities with the Student National Medical Association.

Kenneth Thompson MD

Kenneth Thompson MD,Associate Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

Specialty:

Psychiatry

Grant Year:

2000

Dr. Thompson is a community psychiatrist with extensive experience in organizing and providing psychiatric services to populations in distressed communities. These include developing and implementing services for homeless persons, persons living in public housing projects, racial and ethnic minority communities, persons with HIV, AIDS, persons with severe psychiatric disabilities, persons with addictions, and persons and communities exposed to severe traumas. His fellowship project focused on the health inequities that exist in Allegheny County and the surrounding region, with the goal of eliminating them with assistance from the health-care industry and other resources. Dr. Thompson gathered relevant data, met with community leaders, and organized community conferences as well as networks of clinicians and community members.

Since completing his fellowship, Dr. Thompson has served as the Medical Director of the Center for Mental Health Services in the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) for the past two and a half years. His efforts at DHHS have included co-chairing the Federal Workgroup on Primary Care/Mental Health Integration, developing a program to educate psychiatrists and other professionals in recovery oriented practices and promoting a public health approach to mental health issues.

Jacqueline Tulsky MD

Jacqueline Tulsky MD, Professor of Medicine, University of California at San Francisco

Specialty:

Internal Medicine

Grant Year:

2002

Organization:

Centerforce, Inc.

Dr. Tulsky is a Professor of Clinical Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco and a general internist at San Francisco General Hospital (SFGH) Positive Health Program with an expertise in the care of persons with HIV/AIDS infection.

The goal of Dr. Tulsky’s project with Centerforce was to identify and address barriers to continuity of medical care for persons in the criminal justice system. During her fellowship, she taught inmates at various California prisons as part of the Centerforce programs on health promotion, expanded a Prisoner Health Elective for University of California at San Francisco (UCSF) medical, nursing and pharmacy students, and was invited to provide technical assistance regarding the delivery of health care to inmates in California State Prisons before the Joint Legislative Audit Committee of the California Legislature.

Aaron Wernham MD MS

Aaron Wernham MD MS, Project Director, The Health Impact Project, The Pew Health Group

Specialty:

Family Medicine

Grant Year:

2006

For Dr. Wernham’s fellowship, he worked with the Alaska Inter-Tribal Council to advocate for a more rigorous and attentive approach to human health in the regulatory process for oil development on Alaska's North Slope. The project worked to strengthen the Inupiat community’s voice in industrial development planning in order to protect their health, community well-being, and cultural integrity. As a fellow, Dr. Wernham advocated for the inclusion of a comprehensive health impact assessment (HIA) in the federal environmental impact statement (EIS) permitting process for oil and gas developments near Alaska Native communities. Through close collaboration with Alaska Native organizations, he drafted the first HIAs ever included in a federal EIS. These HIAs resulted in important new protections for Alaska Native communities lying close to oil and gas development. He also initiated and directed a joint state-tribal-federal working group on HIA that developed guidance for incorporating HIA into the EIS process. This working group, with membership including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Bureau of Land Management, Minerals Management Service, state environmental regulatory agencies, and state and tribal health agencies, continues to work today to better evaluate and address the health impacts of large projects on Alaska’s rural communities. Through his fellowship work, Dr. Wernham has become an expert in applying HIA as a tool to promote meaningful policy changes that promote health, and have had the opportunity to give lectures, trainings, and technical assistance to a wide range of agencies and organizations across the United States interested in developing healthy public policy.

Because of the work he began in his fellowship project, Dr. Wernham was invited by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Pew Charitable Trusts to direct a new national center to promote and support the use of Health Impact Assessments throughout the United States.

Robert J. Winn MD

Robert J. Winn MD,Instructor, Jefferson Medical College

Specialty:

Family Medicine

Grant Year:

2004

Dr. Winn is an instructor at Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia. For his fellowship, he worked with The Center for Lesbian and Gay Civil Rights to address health disparities for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth in Philadelphia.

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